STILL LIFE IS AN INTERVIEW-LED ZINE THAT DELVES INTO THE WORLDS OF CARE, KINK AND CHOREOGRAPHY TO EXPLORE STILLNESS, PASSIVITY AND POWER.


@stilllifemag

ISSUE 5 Available 1st November. Pre-order now. Edition of 100.


£10 UK

£12.50 Europe

£15 Rest of the world


Issue 5 looks at ideas of restraint including interviews with HARVEY YOUNG about stillness and the Black body (18);  KELINA GOTMAN about the myth of choreomania (34);  CLAIRE SMITH* about her experience as a prison officer (62); and MAXINE LEEDS CRAIG about why straight, white men don’t dance anymore (76). It also includes a text from HENRI LEFEBVRE  on dressage (2); tales from guardsmen about fainting and laughing on parade (29); photographs by EMMA BACKLUND of play wrestling (50); vintage images and contemporary stories of bondage from THE PRIVATE CASE (87); and a poem by HANNE GRASMO about piss play (101).  Cover photo by Emma Bäcklund


STILL LIFE is an online and printed zine about relationships and configurations in which one person is still while others are not. Or where one person is passive and others are active. 


It’s about how we put ourselves in other people’s hands. Or how we are put in other people’s hands.  It’s about care and power and vulnerability and agency. And other things not so clearly named. It’s about the different kinds of knowledge that people have about their own and other people’s bodies. And the kind of philosophical and political understandings woven into that knowledge.

“A small gem of a magazine”

Maartje Nevejan, Filmmaker

“Enlightening, funny, odd and just brilliant to have around”

Robbie Synge, Choreographer

“Deep, soulful, complex, light, fun”

Anne-Gaëlle Thiriot, Dance artist

“Brilliantly broad and incisive”

Paul Hughes, Artist, dramaturg & writer

“Consistently impressed and intrigued by this excellent zine: not just some incredibly acute thinking about what performance can do, but also what, as a format, a zine can aspire to do. Highly recommended.”

Chris Goode, Theatremaker

“Succeeds in a deeper exploring of a caring practice than I have experienced from care ethics until now. He unravels and disentwines that particular situation to a new essence. He does that without the theoretical concepts about needing care and giving care, organization, power, politics, and even ethics. What happens when we focus solely on the physical interaction in a caring practice?”

Aletta Oosten, zorgethiek.nu careethics blog